Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Textiles’ Category

Welcome Back

How about a totally different challenge? Would anyone like to join me for an Advent Calendar Sew along? Last year I bought an advent calendar fabric panel, printed on it is a Christmas design and pieces to sew onto it to form the pockets for an advent calendar. The one I chose was 899 Fireplace Advent calendar; The Henley Studio Makower UK.

Makower Advent calendar Panel.

Makower Advent calendar Panel.

The principle with these calendar’s is that you cut out the smaller squares  and then sew them onto a main image panel. You back the piece with batting and another decorative fabric on the back. Got to admit I have wanted to do this for ages but have been tying myself in knots about just how to go about it. There are instructions on the panel but I fell into my usual trap of over thinking it, I put it away in the cupboard until now.

Any hoo, I figured if I turned it into a challenge then maybe some of you lovely readers might like to sew along with me to create an advent calender either for your own home or as a gift for someone you love. After looking up the brand name on my panel I discovered that Wendy Gardiner has made a tutorial for how to put one of these panels together.

If you would like to make an advent calendar too you could either use a panel of some sort like this, there are other brands too, or there are also lots of tutorials on You Tube and online if you want to quilt your own designs. Perhaps you’d like to make a garland or any other kind of fabric advent calendar. It would be nice to see some projects made from panels but any kind of fabric advent calendar you choose to make would be welcome to join in too.

So how about it? Would anyone like to sew along with me? I’ll put some links in below so you can see the kinds of panels available, they are quite easily available on Ebay as well as online sewing shops. You can even get an advent calendar design card to use with a Slice fabrique machine if you want to choose your own fabrics and colour scheme.

Links

Check out your favorite sewing store to see if they have any designs you like, or pick your favorite fabrics to create your own Advent calendar.

If you want to design your own style of calendar don’t forget you can use other design cards for the slice for cutting the numbers. The sturdier dies like Sizzix and heavier die cutting machines like Big shot have been shown on C&C cutting felt and cottons. Christmas designs like trees, numbers and holly etc are bound to feature on your favorite craft sites any time soon.

This is a great challenge for anyone else like me who bought one of these and hasn’t yet made it up, or for those looking for something a little different and hand-made for the Christmas season. The panels are ideal for total newbies to sewing as it’s just straight line sewing but there are also Character advent calendar’s like Tilda dolls who wear clothing with many pockets that can be left on a child’s bed for the more advanced or adventurous fabric artist.

To join in with this challenge just leave a comment in the post below. I am also running this challenge on The Sewing Forum, which is a great place to learn, share ideas and make new friends who sew. I know its early for Christmas projects BUT its to give people chance to get their calendars in to give us all a fighting chance of getting them done in time for December 1st.

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie :)

Read Full Post »

Welcome Back

Just wanted to share a picture of my first skirt. The fabric is royal blue polyester cotton. I went with an elastic waist as the style tends to fit me well. I was considering using the cord I made to thread through the casing but I wasn’t convinced by my current skill level with button holes with my machine, so went with elastic instead.

My First Skirt

My First Skirt

The instructions I used to draft the pattern were from Sew What skirts which I reviewed recently. I’ve had the book and the fabric for a few years now, but only recently discovered where to buy pattern paper.

I was very lucky to get a bargain of a nearly new roll of pattern paper on Ebay! So now I’m having a play designing different kinds of patterns. My MIL gave me Winnifred Aldrich book for my birthday, its one big step up from where I am right now but since I am in-between sizes of commercial patterns, I would have to learn how to make lots of alterations to them anyway. At which point if I was going to have to learn all that, I figured why not learn how to draft to my own measurements, at least the patterns I draft should be nearer to my size and then I have full freedom as to the length of things (being a shortie at 5 foot 3) most patterns are designed for people much taller any way.

Wish me luck with it, I’ve also been creating a pattern from an old pair of shorts, which from the test pair I’ve made, are going well. At last I’ll get designs I want to wear without the low slung waists (which I hate) in fabric I like. woo hoo. No more static fests with viscose which seems to be all you can get on the high street.

BIG learning curve and a million miles from the bags I originally wanted my sewing machine for. My late mother would be proud, she used to make all my clothes and spoilt me for expecting things to fit. After she passed away and I found shop clothes such poor fit and quality it was a bit of a shock, such a shame I didn’t have longer with her and the patience to learn when she tried to teach me.

Fingers crossed with some time and patience (who me?!) that I’ll be able to make designs I like, my way and that they will fit. If my Mum who didn’t go to university or study fashion for years could make wonderful clothes, maybe the genes are there and I’ll be able to too.

How about you, what do you like to make with your machines?

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie :)

PS More art when my hands work better! Fine motor skills are beyond me at the moment.

Read Full Post »

Welcome Back

Welcome Back

In today’s post I will be reviewing; Fiskars Patchwork Quilting Ruler 15 x 60 cm.

Fiskars Patchwork ruler 15 x 60 cm

Fiskars Patchwork ruler 15 x 60 cm

Product Details

  • Manufacturer/Brand; Fiskars
  • Item number:
  • RRP at time of writing: Under £17 delivered

Quote from Amazon

  • MARKED IN CMS ONLY .Transparent Ruler ideal for cutting
  • shapes square triangle rectangle and strips etc. for quilting and patchwork
  • highlighted 1cm seam allowance
  • angles clearly marked 30 45 and 60 degrees
  • includes non slip pads ,

Reason For Buying

Recently I have started sewing, well dressmaking with a sewing machine (haven’t the dexterity for hand sewing!!!!). I had a look at commercial patterns and not only were they confusing but also the same problem about being in-between sizes happened with patterns. If I was going to have to learn how to and re draw every pattern I chose, I decided it would be easier to just draft my own from scratch.

After joining a sewing forum and getting tips on what books were best to learn the topic I was also advised to get a LONG ruler, a 15 x 60 cm one. I already have a large square Fiskars ruler and having been happy with it, decided to try their longer version too.

Pros/Cons

Pros

  • Lines are printed in black making them clear and easy to read
  • Several options for numbering; one side includes a 1cm seam allowance the other doesn’t. Make sure you are reading the side of the ruler you mean too or your sizing may be off
  • Numbers are clear but surrounded by a coloured dot
  • There is a cut away area on the ruler which means you can hang it up to store if you wish too.
  • There are non slip feet stickers included in the pack, its nice you have the option to choose weather or not you want them on the ruler.
  • Seam allowance area is highlighted so you can quickly see which area of the ruler you are on
  • If you wish to cut at an angle these are marked on the ruler at 30, 45 and 60 degrees
  • cms have solid line and half centimeters are marked on the rulers with a broken line.
Fiskars ruler 15 x 60 cm

Fiskars ruler 15 x 60 cm

Cons

  • Be a bit careful if you are using the ruler to help you alter patterns or drafting with the ruler, the cut out to allow hanging can snag on pins or your paper as you move the ruler around. Its FINE you just need to be aware of the fact and lift the ruler rather than slide it if you are near papers edge or near pins.

Build Quality

Superb, a very sturdy plastic. Numbers and lines printed clearly and easy to read.

Fiskars ruler 15 x 60 cm

Fiskars ruler 15 x 60 cm

Value for Money

Excellent, not cheap, cheap but well worth the asking price for the build quality.

Would I buy it Again?

Yes, highly recommend it to all

Summing up

These Fiskar rulers are excellent, I love my 30 x 30 cm square one and it works well in combination with this 15 x 60 cm one. So far I’m using them for pattern drafting, but after watching a few quilting shows I could be tempted into trying quilting at a later date.

There are a lot of different rulers on the market for this purpose, some are metric some imperial so you will have plenty of options to choose from. Like buying a car, we all have different reasons for buying one and our needs will vary. Try to see a few different brands in person if possible or at least on close up photos. I used You Tube to see if anyone was posting reviews or tutorials using these kinds of rulers to get a closer look at them. Bear in mind also that different countries may also have different branding colours/options so not all will be available in every country.

Links

Here are a couple of useful links for more information about these rulers, first from the makers at Fiskars and also where to buy them on Amazon UK

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie :)

Read Full Post »

Welcome Back

A strange question perhaps, but what were you reading at aged 8? My fave author was Roald Dahl, so Danny the Champion of the World and the like was my favorite book. The reason you ask, is that the book I received at 8 for Christmas was ‘McCall’s Sewing in Colour’. Home dressmaking, tailoring, mending, soft furnishings!

My First sewing book!

My First sewing book!

As a fairly in-depth technical text-book its a stretch for an average 8-year-old but add in dyslexia (OK we didn’t know that was why I was struggling but small text was always a big issue) So this book other than the obligatory ‘Oh that’s wonderful, thank you’ ( See I was well brought up with good manners) but have to say this book never had more than a quick glance.

Now my Mum was excellent at sewing, and her sister too, so there was some pressure for me to ‘like it’ as well. Anyone with kids will know that is a sure-fire way to send you kids running for the hills and this is what happened to me. Mum tried to show me how to sew and I had a dabble on a hand turned wheel of an elderly Singer machine where I made a few dolly clothes but wasn’t that keen. This brief attempt was enough to cause this book so I steered well clear after that.

Recently though I have returned to sewing and now my hands are too shot for hand sewing (forgive the pun) I have a sewing machine and after pottering with bags for a while decided to try skirts. Remembering this book was in the loft, yes I kept it, even though I couldn’t read it, since my Mum & Aunt were so keen it seemed rude to their memories (They have both passed away now) to ditch it. So I dug out this book to see if with the coloured overlays I could make any sence of it.

Blimey! You sure can see a change in how books of this kind are presented. Today this would almost be considered a serious textbook! Lots of serous text a few line drawings and not so many colour photos. Very 1960′s. Think Star Trek original series and you will imagine the eye-popping colours, bold colour choices for bedrooms n bathrooms!! Terry toweling shower curtains in paisley anyone?

How about you, what were you reading at 8 years old, and what was your first sewing book like?

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie :)

Read Full Post »

Welcome Back

Today I’d like to share a picture of the drawstring bag I made.

Draw string bag

Draw string bag

Here is the bag open

Draw string bag; open

Draw string bag; open

My sewing machine lives in the sideboard, but the foot pedal is always a tangled mess and the plastic bag it came in is really too small for it. So I decided to make it something a bit nicer to live in and help keep the cable under control.

The fabric was left over curtain material from years ago, the cord made from the same fabric. I followed the instructions in the sew what bags book for how to make the casing for the cord and it was quite quick to make. When I get more fabric I’m thinking of making more bags like these but smaller for gadget chargers! The chargers currently live in a plastic box but also end up a tangled mess and takes ages to hunt out the one I want and then ages to untangle it. I’m thinking some kind of tag on the charger bags so I know what they are for ;)

This bag is the same idea as the classic PE bag for school so if you have little uns why not try making one, if not for school then for a place for odds n ends :) How about you, have you ever made one of these? Will you have a go making one this month? Its also a simple project that older children could make for themselves with supervision, so a good one to get the kids sewing.

How about making these in seasonal fabric for an eco friendly version of gift wrapping?

Best wishes and thanks for reading see you soon

Billie :)

Adventures in Sewing Logo

Read Full Post »

Welcome Back

In today’s post I will be reviewing; Sew What! Skirts

Sew What! Skirts

Sew What! Skirts

  • Title: Sew What! Skirts
  • Author: Francesca Denhartog & Corole Ann Camp
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing
  • ISBN: 978-1-58017-625-5

My Reason for Buying

I bought this book because being short skirts from shops are often far too long on me. When I first got my machine I wanted to create styles that I liked from MY choice of fabric as when I went shopping it was either I liked a style or a fabric but rarely found just what I was after and had such trouble getting things to fit that I though making my own might solve these problems. I tell you this as often a review is based on how well the book lived up to the expectations of its reader, for their purpose ;)

Contents

  • Chapter 1; How to use this book
  • Chapter 2; Basic skills
  • Chapter 3; Which Waistline
  • Chapter 4; The Classic A Line
  • Chapter 5; Wrap It!
  • Chapter 6; Circles and squares
  • Chapter 7; Play It Straight with Flair
  • Chapter 8; Layer it
  • Chapter 9; How Many Tiers

Pros/Cons

Pros

  • Suitable for a total newbie
  • Many options for mixing up the various elements for more options on a set of classic styles
  • Classic timeless styles for all occassions
  • Shows you round basic sewing skills, so if this is your first and only sewing book you could still create the designs in there
  • From very simple to more complex designs so as your skills grow more designs are achievable
  • Wire bound so book lies flat on your table as you work from it, but has spine cover so it doesn’t wreck books either side of it on your shelf
  • You need minimal supplies to create the designs in the book
  • Shows you how to create patterns from your own body measurements, so if you are a little un, big un or a long tall sally you will still create a skirt that will fit you.
  • Much simpler to follow than a purchased pattern
  • Encouraging conversational style of writing. Really inspiring a good confidence booster for new sewers.

Cons

  • Just a niggle, the only stumbling block I had with this book was finding large enough paper to draft patterns onto. I have now resolved this and will explain more later in the post.

Value for Money

Excellent! There are 16 styles of skirt in this book, more if you include how many tweaks you could make once you have the idea. The average commercial tissue pattern starts at about £6 so at £12.99 this book is fantastic value for money.

Would I buy it Again?

Totally, this is one of my favorite books.

Summing up

When I bought this book I had recently bought a sewing machine and was keen to make things, anything in fact. I looked at commercial patterns and not only was I totally confused by all the new terms they used but the quality of the tissue used seemed very poor for the price charged. Also just like shop bought clothing, patterns are at fixed sizes, if you are inbetween sizes it means a lot of altering which when you are totally new is very intimidating and put me off.

With this book its such a chatty style you feel very empowered and can’t wait to get sewing. Not constrained by what a commercial designer wants the length or flare of the skirt to be, with this you are the designer, you choose. Like they say in school its a good idea to read at least the first three chapters before you do anything. Its those chapters which explain how you will construct your skirt and lay out options. The skirts in the book build in complexity the later they are in the book but once you have made the first few you get the idea and the more difficult ones suddenly don’t look so hard.

It took me a couple of years to start and actually have a go at making a skirt from this book for one reason only, I struggled to find suitable paper to draw the pattern onto. After joining a sewing forum I discovered the name of such paper and suppliers which I’ll add at the end of the review as being an American book the suppliers listed in the book are all from USA so shipping would be extreme.

Now I’ve found paper to draw on and drafted a pattern on two I’ve had a lot of fun designing styles. I love the flexibility of the ideas shown in the book, if you are a ‘What if?’ kind of person you will love this book, if you are someone who wants to add their own twist to things you will love this book, if you are someone who falls in love with fabric but is boggled by commercial patterns you will love this book.

Sew What Skirts, holds your hand while showing you around fabric, so you know which way up and round you want to lay it to cut out (commercial patterns all expect prior knowledge that we don’t all have!). The book shows you options for different fastenings, you don’t have to do zips if you don’t want to, but they are explained so you have the option.

With this book, some paper and some fabric you design, draft and make your own in a weekend, much quicker if you are more experience sewer. Skirts are easy with this book, so if you can’t find what you like in the high street, have access to some fabric you do like and a sewing machine, grab some BIG paper and get sewing, you’ll be amazed at what you, yes you can achieve. This is a must have book, if you want to try but are too afraid just now.

Links

So now you have read the review you might like to get hold of the book for yourself, its on Amazon and here I’ll also explain where to get the all important paper you need to create your own bespoke patterns.

Paper

Ok the one thing that I struggled with, with this book was finding paper large enough to draw a pattern onto. Not wanting a jig saw of sellotaped pieces, after joining a sewing forum I discovered what you need is called ‘Pattern Paper’ DOH I know it sounds obvious but you need something to start an online search with right?!

Options

Blank newsprint.

This is pretty large but UN printed so no risk of getting you or you fabric covered in ink. Available from house moving suppliers and very in expensive for a huge thick pack about A2 ISH in size. You are likely to need to join sheets of this together but it is widely available.

In the actual pattern paper category you find the following

  • Blank Pattern paper, just what the title suggests. Rolls are available in different widths and on large rolls about 150-200 meters long
  • Dot and Cross Pattern Paper: One side is plain, the other has dots and crosses at approximately 1″ intervals. (I went for this but use the plain side as someone said the printing isn’t always that square and I found that to be the case.)
  • Swedish Tissue Paper; This is the posh stuff. you can draw your pattern onto it but also sew through it so if you want to partially construct your skirt on the paper you are drawing it on to to adjust the fit, this is an option. Its quite expensive and after a mention on The Great British Sewing Bee by Tilly its a swine to get hold of.

Suppliers of the above paper. Auction sites I got mine through Ebay, the advantage is if you are deciding between different paper types you can get 5 – 10 m lengths to try at around £10 longer term if you find one you like, take the hit and buy a roll, its expensive at first around £60 but will last YEARS.

To buy from the UK good places to try are

A little off topic to get into this on this thread, but it was the only thing I struggled with, when trying to make skirts from Sew What skirts book.

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie :)

Read Full Post »

Welcome Back

When I joined a sewing forum, a popular topic was; ‘What books are good for beginners?’

The answer does of course will depend on what you would like to create, but for general sewing, things like home-wares, gifts and to get you started with sewing with a machine, here are several excellent books that I use a lot and are ideal for newbies. There are links at the end of the article for the full reviews that I wrote about the titles mentioned, in earlier posts.

Me and my sewing Machine by Kate Haxell.

Me and my Sewing Machine by Kate Haxell

Me and my Sewing Machine by Kate Haxell

Kate’s book is for those who know they want to sew using a sewing machine, but need a good guide to what a machine can help you do and how to do it. This book holds your hand and shows you round the machine, it tells you about the different feet and what they each do and is also a good no-nonsense guide to essential techniques, for basic sewing. How to create different seams, and how to finish them create a really professional look for your projects. Zip insertion is also covered well is this book.

Check out the link below for my earlier review. This is also a good book to look at, before you buy your first sewing machine.

Sew What Bags by Lexie Barnes

Sew What Bags by Lexie Barnes

Sew What Bags by Lexie Barnes

This one is perfect for newbies as it expects no prior knowledge. If you want to make a PE bag for the kids its in here, gifts suitable for friends family and little projects perfect for fetes are also included here. There are totes, tissue holders, little purses etc. Nice small achievable confidence building project for the new sewer.

Sew What Skirts by Denhartog & Camp

Sew What Skirts by Denhartog and Camp

Sew What Skirts by Denhartog and Camp

Another nice straight forward and inspiring book, also expecting little or no prior knowledge of sewing. As the intro to the book says ‘If you can thread your sewing machine and find the straight and zig zag stitches you can create the projects in this book.

Sew What Skirts shows you how to take your own body measurements, to create a range of different skirts. Classic styles to get you going but when you have more experience, you can mix n match ideas from the various styles for different waist bands and fastenings, add pockets and trims to your heart’s content so you can really personalise the designs to your own look.

If the thought of a commercial pattern confuses you and frightens you, (me too by the way!) This book is for you.

I have just made a trial skirt from this books instructions and it came out great. If you have to do a lot of altering on a commercial pattern, why not start with this book instead. Since YOUR measurements are used not that of some fictional ‘standard’ person ;)

The Sewing Book by Alison Smith

The Sewing Book by Alison Smith

The Sewing Book by Alison Smith

THE must have sewing book. A wonderfully clear reference book of visual instructions for so many sewing techniques. Not the chatty style of the earlier books but definitely one to have on your bookshelf as it walks you through many techniques.

I did buy a commercial pattern and couldn’t follow what I was meant to be doing. When I looked the technique up in Alison’s book, there were photos of the technique which made it much easier to see what I was meant to be doing. Not overly wordy, but definitely a keeper and excellent for visual learners. If you are trying to fathom the markings on commercial patterns they are covered here as are some basic alterations for patterns too.

Home-made Vintage by Christina Strutt

Home Made Vintage

Home Made Vintage

If you are more into home-wares and would like to make something timeless and elegant try this book. Its kind of Anna Griffin meets Tilda ;) If you walk through John Lewis and the like and think ‘Ooh so nice’, but the prices are beyond your pocket try this book. From cushion covers to table decoration. You could take the ideas found in here in many different directions. For example there is an envelope shoe bag that with some alteration to the size and the addition of padding, would make a great e-reader/tablet cover/cozy.

Lots of things in here for all ages and some would also make great gifts. Take the ideas as a starting point and add your own imagination, with different style fabrics you could change the look and feel to any style you like. The picture in the photo was from a library book with hard cover, when I bought the book it was a paperback and had a different cover but essentially all the same content.

My other favorite sewing book is The Bag Making Bible by Lisa Lam. I love it but perhaps it doesn’t belong on books for beginners as although it covers many aspects of making bags, the techniques are for those with more experience. For complete newbies go with Sew what bags, if you have passed that stage and want to explore different fastenings, add pockets and zippers then Lisa’s book is a real must have.

Hope you will check out the links below for my full reviews of the books I’ve mentioned. These books have been so helpful in my sewing journey. I was scared of sewing for so long, but with the help and encouragement of these books, and some help from forum buddies, my sewing is improving with every project.

Links

The following links take you to my full reviews of these books and to where you can buy them.

My best advice is to grab some cheap fabric or old sheets that you can practice with before you try to make something in particular. Work out what stitches you like and how techniques work before making a finished project, that way you won’t have so much pressure and when you do make a project, have much better chance of making something you love and will use.

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie :)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 249 other followers