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Posts Tagged ‘ATC’

Welcome Back

I post a lot over on the Stamping Mad Forum, and this month the ATC theme was ‘Dots’. Having just bought a set of Scallop Nestabilites dies and needing an excuse to use them I made the following ATC

Inks; Ranger Adirondack Dye ink; Willow, Pink Sherbert, Watermelon. Versafine; Onyx Black. White gel pen

Stamps; Anna Griffin Rose Background, Rose motif

Nestabilities; Large Oval Scallop

 

I applied the inks using Cut n Dry foam from Ranger, the shading around the edge of the scallop is created by applying addtional layers of the light ink until desired shade is created. The dark edge is the watermelon ink. The background was created by sponging on Willow ink to colour the base card, then the background was stamped on using the same colour of ink. I edged the card using the Watermelon ink. The Rose motif was from a clear set of Anna Griffin stamps from QVC, these are perfect for smaller cards as the images are scalled down from the full sized woodmounted stamps by Anna Griffin.

Check out the Rubber stamping tab at the top of the page for links to suppliers websites.

 

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie

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Welcome Back

Today’s article is all about stamps. I am going to give you a list of the sorts of stamps and elements that make for good design. Exactly what images you buy will be down to personal taste, as will be how you use them.

My favorite designer is Anna Griffin, and from her I have learnt that a good card/page design is made up of a few essential elements.

  • Background; create an overall pattern as a background to your main images
  • Cartouche; Frames
  • Salutation; Wording/ text for greeting etc
  • Motif; This would be your main image
  • Boarder; use for edges or frames
  • Embellishment; extra feature to enhanse the appeal of your project.

 

For many years I collected stamps based on ‘Ohh that’s nice’ and I bought it. The problem with that approach is without at least some planning you end up with a large collection of images that simply do not go with each other. This was brought home to me most obviously when  I started taking part in swaps over on the Stamping Mad Forum www.stampingmadforum.co.uk As soon as I tried to make a card/ATC/Moo to a theme I realised that my images simply didn’t go together! Ahhhh. Once I had collected some of Anna’s stamps it was incredible what a differrence using images that were designed to compliment each other made on the finished cards. 

From then on, whenever I buy any image it is definately with a mind as to what it will go with. I have mentioned before that I take a ringbinder of photocopied images from the stamps I have, with me when I go shopping. That way I can see if the image I am considering will ‘go with’ what I already have. It can also help if you like a particular designer as collecting images from a range by them are more likely to co-ordinate.

 

Links

My current favourite designers are

 

Best wishes and thanks for reading

 

Billie xx

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Welcome Back

To round up our week on the Scor It board, here is a nice easy tutorial on how to make quick accurate blanks for your ATCs. An ATC or Artist’s Trading Card measures 2.5 x 3″

You will need

  • A4 cardstock in the colour of your choice
  • Scor It board
  • Steel Ruler
  • Self healing cutting mat
  • Craft knife with sharp blades.

 

Method

1.  Place your card stock onto the Scor it board with the Short edge right up to the ruler guide at the top of the board. Move your cardstock until it lines up with the 2.5″ mark on the ruler and score a line.

Scoring blank ATCs using Scor It board

 

2.  Move the cardstock across so that the line you just scored now lines up with the 2.5″ mark on the ruler guide and score a line here.

  Scoring ATC blanks using the Scor It Board.

 

3.  Move the cardstock across so that the line you just scored now lines up with the 2.5″ mark on the ruler guide and score a line here.

Scoring ATC blanks using the Scor It board

 

 

You will have scored three lines and have a short piece left. We will be cutting that short piece off later but for now ignore it.

 

4.  Turn your cardstock so that the long edge of your paper now lines up with the ruler. This is know as the ‘Landscape’ orientation.

Scoring blank ATCs using the Scor It board

 

5.  Move the card stock so that the edge of the paper lines up with the 3.5″ mark on the ruler guide and score a line.

Scoring blanks ATCs usignthe Scor It board

 

6.  Move the cardstock across so that the line you just scored now lines up with the 3.5″ mark on the ruler guide and score a line here.

Scoring B;ank ATCs using the Scor it board

 

7.  Move the cardstock across so that the line you just scored now lines up with the 3.5″ mark on the ruler guide and score a line here.

Scoring blanks ATCs using the Scor It board

 

You will have scored three lines and have a short piece left.

 Scoring blank ATCs using the Scor It board

 

8.  Place your cardstock onto a self healing cutting mat and cut along all your score lines.

9.  You will now have nine blank ATCs and a couple of narrow scrap pieces of cardstock. We crafters never throw anything away, so put the scrap pieces in your scrap box and they can be used to create boarders and for smaller stamped pieces.

 

There, I said it was a nice easy one to finish on. I hope you have enjoyed our week with the Scor It board and it has given you just a taste of what can be done with the board. If you have any questions or comments I would be pleased to hear from you, just fill in the box below and I will get back to you.

 

Best wishes and thanks for reading, see you soon

Billie xx

 

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Welcome back

Today I would like to share with you the ATC or Artist’s Trading Card holder that I made with the help of the Scor It board.

Longstitch book with wrap around cover        Longstitch book with oriental images and wrap around cover

As you can see this book has a wrap around cover and the scoring for this I achieved using the Scor It board, simply taking the measurements from the pages, to guide me where to score.  I used a Crop A Dile tool to punch the two holes and then a craft knife to join the holes together, to form the slit into which the back covers edge fits into to hold the book closed.

Longstitch book with wrap around cover; inside pages

The pages themselves were cut from a 12 x 12″ scrapbook cardstock, using my trusty DreamKuts machine.  I then stamped with the oriental images using Adirondack dye based ink in Willow. I added photo corners to hold the ATCs in place.

Lonstitch book with wrap around cover; Oriental images; detail of spine

This shows the longstitch itself, which is the binding that is holding the pages in place. I used Barbour thread, in this book it is the 18/3 cord the same as I used on the Stab bindings 

https://billiescraftroom.wordpress.com/2008/06/04/japanese-4-hole-binding-my-first-attempt/  I cut thread to length and then waxed with Beeswax before sewing, to help keep the knots in place. This book is 3″ wide and ?” tall.

Further reading

If pestered I could do a tutorial on how to cut and score the cover but you will need to refer to the following books if you would like to learn the longstitch itself. This is because it is FAR too detailed to go into in the confines of a blog space.

Keith Smith Non Adhesive binding Volume I

Cover to Cover by Shereen La Plantz

For further details of these books please see the BOOKBINDING tab at the top of the blog.

Best wishes and thanks for reading

Billie :)

 

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